About your Search

20120701
20120731
STATION
WJLA 22
WMAR (ABC) 22
KGO (ABC) 21
LANGUAGE
English 65
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 65 (some duplicates have been removed)
tell us how they survived this terrifying collapse. >>> forgotten flyers? a 19-hour nightmare. no air conditioning. no food. and a new video of passengers on the tarmac. >>> flame fighters. a fire breaks out. these people try to use the fire extinguisher and can't. could you? >>> and fear factor. what this man chased by a great white shark is saying tonight. >>> good evening. as we come on the air tonight, it is official. the government confirms this is the hottest six months in u.s. history. more than 24,000 heat records broken already this year. and as the heat takes a brief break in parts of the country tonight, storms are sweeping in, toppling buildings. our extreme weather team out in force. and abc's david kerley starts us off. david? >> reporter: in this texas baseball stadium and across the country, the historic heat wave went out with a boom! a boom of lightning. the twins and the rangers battling each other, and the weather here, sending players running not for the ball, but for cover. watch it again. an explosion of storms. one of the strongest in fredericksburg, virginia.
strikes. the sky lit with destructive potential. abc's ginger zee is tracking it all for us. >> we'll start with a map that shows you the watches and thunderstorm watches. if you are in this area, got a chance of seeing 60 to 80 miles an hour wind, large hails and reports in of tornadoes. bottom line, we're in the thick of it as this summer of extremes continues. severe storms almost everywhere you look tonight. let's start in pennsylvania, blinding rains and damages winds blew through that town. then outside new york, the first images coming in from a tornado that ripped roofs from homes and trapped people in their cars. there was pounding hail in cincinnati, angry skies and incredible lighting around the great lakes. even before tonight's severe weather eruption, it had been a wild week. the nation has has been more 700 reports of damaging wind since monday alone. these images from kansas, power lines slapped by violent winds. >> the wind came up in a second. >> reporter: the severe storms are being fed in part by the extreme heat. the nation still plastered with heat warnings an
the bombing, fueling all kinds of rumors. when i last interviewed him in 2005, i asked him about the u.s. overtly seeking a new syrian leader, even then. >> i feel very confident for one reason. because i was made in syria. i wasn't made in the united states. i'm not worried. >> reporter: but he must be worried now. i spoke with a senior israeli official here in jerusalem about what might happen to assad himself. >> unfortunately, we are going to witness quite a long process of bloodshed. otherwise, he might be assassinated and it could -- it can happen within a day. >> and christiane amanpour joins us now. christiane, how does it look to you? is this a signal the end is near? >> reporter: well, look, i think everybody is hoping that will be the case. and honestly, you cannot have the decapitation of the regime's entire defense, intelligence and security apparatus without it having a severe impact on the regime. on the other hand, some people say he might double down and really fight to the very end. >> but what impact does this have on iran? does this mean iran is also weakened, isolate
. >>> and the secret of champions, olympians are just like us. are they? why they're faster, better, stronger than mere mortals and how you can be too. >>> good evening. as we come to air nearly 40 million americans are standing the skies, wondering what the night will bring. high winds, tornadoes and wicked weather across a massic swath of the country right now. a line of storms stretching more than 1,600 miles. just look at this map, outbreaks from tulsa to the tip of massachusetts. reports poring in, twisters touching down. tens of thousands of lightening strikes. the sky lit with destructive potential. abc's meteorologist ginger zee is tracking it all for. what are you seeing. >> reporter: tonight the biggest threat is what i have to take you to. i'll show you the map and all the watches that everyone is seeing. if you are in this area, you have a chanc of seeing at least 60 to 8 o miles an hour winds, large hail h and gets reports in of tornadoes. bottom line, we're in the thick of it, as this summer of extremes continues. >> reporter: severe storms almost ever where you look tonight. let's start
thomas tells us the latest clues at this hour. >> reporter: delta passenger james tonges knew something was wrong just after he bit into a turkey sandwich during a flight home to minneapolis. >> it was on the second bite into the sandwich that actually poked the top of my mouth. it was about a one-inch long straight needle. >> tonges' turkey sandwich was one of six on flights from amsterdam with sharp needles. the fbi suspects someone tried to turn turkey sand witches into weapons in an act of sabotage. and tonight, this new scare is raising critical questions about airline security. how safe from tampering is airline food. >> food that goes onto an airplane is not screened. not certainly like a passenger or luggage would be screened. >> reporter: ironically, two of the victims knew each other. and one of their sons, a passenger on another flight, claims he got a tainted sandwich, too. could this be a coincidence? authorities are checking. gate gourmet catering company which prepared the food operates in 28 countries. it serves an average of 9,700 flights every day. and over 300 million
girl nearly snatched by this stranger in broad daylight. how police are enlisting every one of us to eye department if i the predator. >>> made in america. the firestorm over those olympic uniforms, made in china. well, what about the clothes on your back? tonight, david muir with american workers who are already bringing jobs and that label right back home. >>> good evening. tonight, an astonishing strike at the heart of a dictatorship. it is like something out of an international thriller. a bomb, right in the command center of syria's president bashar assad. at least three of his key commanders have been killed, including his powerful brother-in-law. one rebel said, "this is the beginning of the end." so, what does this mean for the united states? and what about syria's dangerous ally, iran? abc's global affairs anchor christiane amanpour has the story tonight. >> reporter: fighting raged in the capital after an unp unprecedented strike at the heart of the once untouchable syrian regime. bashar assad must be wondering who he can trust after a bomb was detonated in once of its m
in precisely the wrong place. >> half the people that die from lightning strikes in the u.s. this year were standing under trees and the other half were out in open fields. >> reporter: lightning typically strikes the tallest object around. the current can travel down the tree and into your body. experts say the best thing you can do is seek shelter in a large enclosed building. the lightning will travel through the wiring or the plumbing and into the ground, away from you. that's what happened in washington state this weekend, when lightning started this house fire. the homeowner was blown across the living room but survived. if you do make it inside, do not use a corded telephone or anything plugged into the wall. lightning can travel through the wiring. same goes for plumbing. but stay away from sinks, tubs and showers. and if you are outside, seek shelter in a car. the lightning will travel through the metal of the car and down to the ground. that's what happened to a family in new york this weekend. lightning hit their rv. four children had to be rescued but everyone lived. to give you
malfunction. the u.s. olympic team, their uniforms made in china? our made in america team, on that case tonight. >>> good evening. we begin with that explosion that has 100 million americans wondering about the train tracks in their neighborhoods. outside columbus, ohio, in the dead of night, a train carrying the chemical ethanol derailed, a massive burst of flame, 30 feet high. one eyewitness said it was as if the sun had exploded. hundreds of residents had to flee their homes. it is not often a blast this big is caught on tape and tonight, investigators are studying this film for clues as to what happened. abc's alex perez takes us to ts. >> jesus [ bleep ]. >> reporter: a frightening boom. an orange glow of raging flames visible as far as ten miles away. it was 2:00 a.m., and shawn wall had just come home after working the late shift. he grabbed his phone and started recording. what did it feel like on your skin? >> it felt like standing next to a bonfire, like, what i mean, i mean, like, putting your hands, like, right there next to the heat and your skin is starting to tingle and f
>>> tonight on "world news" -- hot planet. the world is heating up. and for the first time, a u.s. government-backed report finds that searing heat shows epic storms to man-made global warming. >>> pilot meltdown, the jetblue pilot who terrified passengers with his tirade. today, we're told that too little sleep was to blame. >>> behind the scenes. an extraordinary abc news advance. the drama, the healing at the hospital. and dr. mehmet oz, here to tell us how to be the smartest patient you can be. >>> and small wonders. the new trend in teeny apartments. the size of two parking spaces. fold-away stoves? >>> good evening. we begin with a new report and a major alert about the speed of climate change on this planet. hundreds of scientists from around the globe saying today there is evidence that global warming is accelerating. sea levels rising, greenhouse gases mounting, glaciers melting. and for the first time, a government-backed report links the recent wild weather to man-made causes. so is this a kind of tipping point? abc's weather editor sam champion begins by breaking it do
. >> reporter: david, some utility crews soming from as far aaway as canada to help out. they tell us that just because the black down the street gets power back, it doesn't mean this power line is next. folks here are finding out they may not see anything until sunday. >> reporter: swift, powerful and unforgettable. the sky was flashing for over half and hour, like an alien movie. severe storms robbed more than two million people of a comfortable weekend. across these states and d.c. >> this was like a war zone. everyone was in shock saturday morning. >> the workers who are going to make this all better. do people look at you like your santa claus? >> no. they just want to know when their power is going to be back on. >> i'm not sure it's still good. doesn't smell so good. >> reporter: and are running short on ideas. kelly and her boys have been cooling off in the air-conditioned car and camping in the cool basement. >> reporter: so this is where you are sleeping? >> reporter: yeah. people will check to see when repair crew wills come to their block. >> it could be as late as sunday before eve
, hsbc was under fire for using their bank to enable drug lords, even suspected terrorists. abc's chief investigative correspondent brian ross tracks down the men at the top. >> reporter: it is one of the world's best known banks. and in its commercials, hsbc boasts of being the bank of choice for everyone. >> hsbc, world bank. >> reporter: according to today's senate report, among those who have made it their bank of choice are the ruthless leaders of mexican drug cartels, suspected al qaeda money men, and the iranian government trying to get around u.s. embargoes. >> you need to have a bank that's willing to take you on as a customer. knowing that your customers are dodgy, your relationships are bad and you're in illegal activity. >> reporter: and internal documents show hsbc executives knew exactly what they were doing. "we are allowing organized criminals to lauder their money" wrote one executive. today, executives sheepishly admitted there have been cover-ups and accounts were left open for years. >> is there any way that should have been allowed to happen at the time? >> no, sena
's lindsey davis is following this developing news for us. >> reporter: it is the latest drama to befall the kennedys. police say kerry kennedy, the daughter of robert kennedy, was charged with driving while impaired with drugs. it happened around 8:00 this morning along interstate 684, north of new york city. the 52-year-old ex-wife of andrew cuomo,sideswiped a tractor trailer. according to 911 calls, her call was operating in an erratic manner. she was found passed out behind the wheel. kerry kennedy voluntarily took breathizer, blood, and urine tests, all of which showed no drugs or alcohol whatsoever? her system. the charges were filed before the test results were available. kerry has no known history of drug abuse. she was open with police. she told them she had taken ambien. the ken dishave been rief with family misfortune. just this may, marry kennedy committed suicide after battling depression. he was kerry who introduced the couple. they had been roommates. after marry's pass rk, kerry wrote an ode to my best friend marry. lindsey davis, abc news. the olympic games are drawing n
the wheel of the car. abc's lindsey davis is following this developing news for us. >> reporter: it is the latest drama to be fall the ken dis. carry kennedy t daughter of robert kennedy was charged with driving while impaired with drugs. it happened around 8:00 this morning along interstate 684, north of new york city. the 52-year-old ex-wife sideswiped a tractor trailer. according to naen calls her call was operating in anner rad eijkmaner. she was found passed out behind the wheel. she told them she was on prescription drugs. >> kerry has no known history of drug abuse. she was open with police. she had taken ambien. >> because it was in the morning. so she could have taken it at night. >> 8:00 in the morning. >> everyone saw these headlines. with all the recent news extremely concerned. thank you, lindsey. >> now we move on. the olympic games are drawing near as you know and security officials across the globe are at a high alert for terrorism. we have evidence tonight of what that means in a plane drama that unfolded on board delta flight 126. the plane made an emergency la
evening. it sa point of pride when the u.s. olympic team walks into the stadium with the american flag flying, but last night we told you we had learned that america's athletes will be wearing clothes made in china. our report, members of congress called for action and olympic committee members ducked for cover. and remember, all of a clothing of mementos for team usa were made right here at home, it would keep $1 billion from heading overseas as one of you wrote us. what were they thinking? abc's sharyn alfonsi, one of the leaders of our made in america team spent the day gets answers. she's here right now. >> you can probably imagine, this is out rage on toll hill, politics on both sides of the aisle wondering how this could have happened. some even calling for these team uniforms for maed usa to be burned. >> the men and women of team usa, march into london's opening ceremonies with the world watching, team usa will be wearing clothing on the entire made in china. >> you look dashing. >> thank you very much. >> we outfitted our producer carlos and intern katherine in the official op
: there was saturation coverage on local tv news, and police used the cutting edge approach of posting the video on facebook, youtube, and twitter. they say the footage, which abc news aired last night, was shared so often that an estimated eight million people may have viewed the video. >> it demonstrates the power of getting information out, having good video and calling on the public. >> reporter: authorities say figueroa fagot has an extensive criminal record, and had been accused of sexual assault before. but today there is relief and police say that disturbing tape was the catalyst in breaking the case. what was unique about this case was to see the suspect's hunt and attack plan fully play ourt on tape. he pulled up in white sedan. he had been watching the children. the kids walked by. the suspect gets out of the car and begins stalking them. in the end, police say the children were the real heroes. a little girl who fought back. >> the fact is she struggled almost immediately. >> and a cute little boy with a big set of lungs. >> she said never screamed as loud, never heard him scream tha
. and the friends at the "wall street journal" use popsicle sticks, reenactments. if anyone has acrobatic cat, they should dress up in tiny unitards, they will do the same down the road. >> you are going to be back in a minute to report on the debate of the young swimmer from china. can a 16-year-old girl really swim faster than the olympic men? look at her big hands, her feet? that is coming up. and here is the total medal count tonight. china and the usa v u.s. tied, 23 medals each. and japan is third. >>> back in this country a close call in the sky today. a bird collided with a pack the united airlines jet flying into denver and the bird punctured a hole in the front with a gaping hole in the nose. fortunately, the flight landed safely. but as clayton sandell reports, bird strikes are a growing threat. >> reporter: it could have been cat frofic. a feathery midair collision. this united 737, with 151 passengers, on approach to denver international airport today when it collided with what appears to be a large bird. the impact tore a giant diamond-shaped hole in the nose, even ripping off f
? >>> and made in america. one viewer's tweet to us today, the photo we couldn't ignore. the american flags made in china. and "world news," back on the hunt tonight to solve the problem. >> made bill americans, for americans, supplied by americans. >>> good evening, and it is great to have you with us. america is now 236 years old tonight, and you've never had a birthday as hot as this one. at least not on the record books. we are shattering records everywhere tonight. this image from the air, saying it all. tens of thousands of beach goers right there at coney island in brooklyn, new york. so many people, you can hardly see the sand there. families, children across the country trying to stay cool. this image from chicago, a young boy trying to beat the heat. there was this young face at a parade in indiana today. 25 states under excessive heat warnings and advisories tonight. more than 80 million americans dealing with heat near 100 or above. minneapolis, milwaukee, chicago, st. louis and detroit, just some of the sometimes where it reached triple digits. we are just four days into july now, a
a downpour, with pomp, circumstance, celebrities and royals. why getting the gold isn't what it used to be. a secret transformation, american athletes hypersculpting their body. >>> true grit. ♪ ♪ i can see clearly now, the rain is gone ♪ >>> a father dances with his daughter, but it's unlike any other day. >>> good evening. as we come to air, 12 states are bracing for yet another night of powerful storms, lightning hail, and high winds. this after last night's destruction. these snapshots you see, tell the tale, an almost impossibly large storm cloud, consumes the horizon. america virtually under siege by mother nature. abc's meteorologist ginger zee tracking it for us. what's next? >> i just got back from an area that was hardest hit,mira, new york. they had a tornado, one of three, more than 400 severe weather reports in all. >> reporter: spectacular storms -- almost 400,000 lightning strikes from missouri to connecticut. >> i heard a crack and i'm, like, it was a telephone pole, and wires were still live. >> reporter: with the lightning, came heavy rain. winds up to 75 miles per
remembering his father. >> good evening, it's great to have you with us on a tuesday night. we begin tonight on the eve of what could well be the hottest 4th of july ever in many parts of this country. if you thought it felt warmer today, there is good reason. look at this. with humidity on the rise, combined with the temperatures and you get the heat index, what it feels like, hitting a hundred and above across much of the nation. tonight one picture says it all. check out this video from wisconsin, a highway buckling under the heat. an suv hitting that buckle in the road and then soaring. tonight we have a team on this, from the heat to the fires. to the firework bans in towns across america now. abc's extreme weather team, ginger gee leading us off. >> reporter: desperate for ice and water in west virginia volunteers delivering relief. >> it's 104 degrees in the shade up at our house right now. >> reporter: in illinois long lines to buy generators. in wisconsin, oven-like heat caused a road to buckle, creating a ramp that launched that suv into mid-air. teresa pulled over to take a pictur
by mother nature. abc's meteorologist ginger zee tracking it for us. what's next? >> i just got back from an area that was hardest hit, elmira, new york. they had a tornado, one of three, more than 400 severe weather reports in all. >> reporter: spectacular storms -- almost 400,000 lightning strikes from missouri to connecticut. >> i heard a crack and i'm, like, it was a telephone pole, and wires were still live. >> reporter: with the lightning, came heavy rain. winds up to 75 miles per hour. >> the sky was pitch black, watching the trees fall. it was chaos. >> reporter: and three ef-1 tornadoes packing winds up to 110 miles per hour. one was in montrose, pennsylvania, the other two north in new york state. carol martin and her family were home when a twister hit elmira, new york. >> the tree comes smashing right through the window in the house. >> reporter: have you ever seen anything like this? >> never in my 51 years. i've never seen anything like this. reporter: the line of extreme weather marching east was more than 1,300 miles long. and within it, serial derechos.
fbi agent brad garrett to fill us in. >> he is in a reality that he that he created. there is a combination of the reality of what happened to him has set in. what it has done to himself and the victims. >> reporter: after james holmes was in court, the prosecutor was asked if he was on something. >> we have no information on that. >> reporter: the other question, if they will pursue the death penalty. >> if the death penalty is sought, it's a long process that impacts their lives for years. >> reporter: saifd sanchez, said his daughter nearly escaped the theater. her husband in a coma. >> you felt your daughter needed to come. >> when it's your own daughter, and she escaped from death by just mere seconds, would say it makes you angry. >> what do you say is the punishment for this guy? >> death. >> reporter: families in california saying their hearts go out to the victims. the attorney says this about james holmes' parents, who watched their son go from this at age 18 to this. >> i think everyone can imagine how they are feeling. anyone who has ever been a parent. >
and local media were the first to air the tape last night. philadelphia police are using the cutting edge approach of posting crime video on facebook, youtube, and twitter. they say the footage, which abc news aired last night, was shared so often that an estimated eight million people may have viewed the video. >> it demonstrates the power of getting information out, having good video and calling on the public. >> reporter: authorities say figueroa fagot has an extensive criminal record, and had been accused of sexual assault before. but today there is relief and police say that disturbing tape was the catalyst in breaking the case. >> you picked the wrong kid. >> announcer: that's the message from the girl's mother. as for her daughter, she says she's doing well. >> since he's been captured, she's been smiling, wanting to play, trying to be a kid. >> reporter: in the end, the children were the real heroes. a little girl who fought back. >> the fact is she struggled almost immediately. >> reporter: and a cute little boy with a big set of lungs. >> she said he had never screamed as loud.
news has learned about a notebook and dan harris tells us tonight what is new. dan? >> reporter: diane, good evening. tonight, we are learning that before james holmes allegedly carried out his attack and before he ended up in the jail behind me, he may have mailed out a road map to the massacre. tonight, abc news has learned a notebook believed to be written by the suspect, james holmes, was mailed to the university of colorado, where holmes had been a student, until dropping out last month. fox news is reporting the notebook was mailed to a psychiatrist at the university and that it contains, quote, full details about how he was going to kill people. drawings of what he was going to do in it. drawings and illustrations of the massacre. there are conflicting reports on whether the notebook arrived at the university before or after the massacre. but it apparently wasn't found until monday, during a search of the mail room. this, of course, raises questions about whether if the package had been found before last thursday, the carnage could have been avoided. the university will not conf
, falling more than 500 miles per hour today. what did he teach us about human endurance? >>> good evening. as we come on the air, we are beginning to piece together clues about the suspected shooter in aurora, colorado, in the days before the massacre, in the movie theater. one clue. abc news has learned about a notebook and dan harris tells us tonight what is new. dan? >> reporter: diane, good evening. tonight, we are learning that before james holmes allegedly carried out his attack and ended up,the jail behind me. he may have railed out a road map to the massacre. tonight, abc news has learned a notebook believed to be written by the suspect, james holmes, was mailed to the university of colorado, where holmes had been a student, until dropping out last month. fox news is reporting the notebook was mailed to a sigh can i tryst at the university and that it contains, quote, full details about how he was going to kill people. drawings of what he was going to do in it. drawings and illustrations. there are conflicting reports on whether the notebook arrived at the university before or aft
and his head dropping. we asked former fbi agent brad garrett to watch it and tell us what he was seeing. >> he is not in the courtroom mentality. he is elsewhere. he is in a reality that he that he created. there is a combination of the reality of what happened to him has set in. what it has done to himself and as well as the victims. >> reporter: after james holmes was in court, the prosecutor was asked if he was on something. >> we would have no information about that. >> reporter: the other question, will she pursue the death penalty? she said she will ask the victims' families first. >> if the death penalty is sought, it's a long process that impacts their lives for years. >> reporter: david sanchez said his daughter nearly escaped the theater. her husband shot in the head, in a coma. this morning, her daughter asked him to go to court. >> you felt your daughter needed to come. >> when it's your own daughter, and she escaped from death by just mere seconds, i would say it makes you angry. >> what do you say is the punishment for this guy? >> death. >> reporter: the suspect's family
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 65 (some duplicates have been removed)